Landscaping An Outdoor Oasis On The Cheap

by Texas Homesteader ~
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RancherMan & I spend lots of time outside.  Not only for our work here on the homestead, but for pleasure too.  And we love the view from our back porch.  Recently I wrote about expanding that back porch to include an Outdoor Living room – be sure to check that out.

But now that the porch addition has been installed I need to landscape it into the peaceful oasis I’ve got my heart set on.  But I need to landscape it on the cheap, y’all.  It was surprisingly easy to do.  Come see!

Terracotta plant watering spike. We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

Low-Cost Landscaping Stones

I wanted low-maintenance plants around our new porch addition and I had very specific ideas on how I wanted the finished landscaping to look.  The porch was built on land that sloped away from the house. So I wanted to build up the area around the porch with landscaping stones and fill it in with soil.  I wanted another layer of landscaping stones to hold large galvanized cattle troughs which would also be filled with soil for planting.  But I didn’t want to spend much money.  Lofty goal?  Read on, dear friends.

Those landscape stones can be pricey but we used our credit card rewards points to receive gift cards to a big-box store.  (I wrote about this super-frugal tip along with with other tips to keep all our monthly expenses small, check it out!)

Terracotta plant watering spike. We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

The price of those landscape stones were paid using points for things we buy every month anyway such as groceries, gas and cattle feed.

Planting Soil For A Song

You know how it is, for some reason buying DIRT is pricey! So we did a little searching.  We found a local guy who had a sand & gravel business.  He dumped a tractor-bucket full of sandy soil into huge tubs placed in the back of our truck for a mere $25.

That same soil purchased in large plastic sacks from a big-box store would have been several hundred dollars.  Oh, and there would have been all that plastic to deal with too! (have I mentioned lately how much I hate plastic?) 

I talked about the soil acquisition on my latest 5-Frugal Ways I Saved Money & The Environment I posted recently.

Cheap fill dirt without plastic waste. Terracotta plant watering spike. We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

Then we went to a rock company and got a large, flat landing rock for the bottom of each  step.  RancherMan used a sealer we already had in the shop leftover from another project to seal it.  He just liked the way it made them look wet, intensifying the color variations.   I must say I agree.

When the beds were built it was time to start adding the plants.  I don’t have to tell you how quickly that can add up to a wad of cash!  But I was after a primarily edible landscape plan with lots of bee-friendly flowers.

Gifted & Transplanted Plants

My aunt dug this wispy grass (I have no idea what it’s called but I love it) from a section of her flower beds where it had popped up unwanted.  I brought it home & planted it here.  Love it!

And I pulled the tiny Crepe Myrtle tree out of my veggie garden where it came up as a volunteer plant.  Not wanted in the veggie garden, but much loved here!  It’s all about taking what you’ve already got & putting it where it works best for you.

Terracotta plant watering spike. We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

My sister gave me three small lavender plants that were leftover from her daughter’s wedding.  I love lavender and so do the bees. So of course I incorporated them into this landscape!

Then of course I transplanted a clump of thyme and oregano from the garden.  The bees love it when they bloom.  I also transplanted several clumps of tiny seedum that originally came from my grandparent’s home decades ago. It will make a nice maintenance-free ground cover which will help conserve moisture in the sandy soil.

Terracotta plant watering spike. We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

On the other side I transplanted more seedum and a sprinkling of Alyssium seeds that I found in my seed stash from years ago.  I didn’t know if they were still viable but they germinated!  I love those tiny purple blooms.

Terracotta plant watering spike. We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

On the east side of the porch I transplanted a small cilantro plant that had volunteered itself in the garden. And my aunt gave me a small dill plant too that she was going to have to remove from her own beds.  Gotta love herbs this fresh!  Hey, just because it’s edible doesn’t mean it can’t be beautiful too.  And the bees love those blooms.

Living Sun-Shade

Oh, and here’s a clever thing too. During the hottest part of the summer, the sun is as far in the northern sky as it can go.  So when it comes up it often glares right in our faces until it gets high enough to be shaded by the porch.  But by then it’s too hot to be lounging outside drinking our morning coffee.

I had a partial packet of Mammoth Sunflower seeds in my seed stash. So I’ve planted a couple of mammoth sunflowers both for the natural sun screen they’ll provide with their huge leaves as well as the plate-sized blossoms that I love and are the bee’s delight.  RancherMan & I can sip our coffee outside and be shaded from the sun in the cooler early morning hours.

Living sun screen - mammoth sunflowers. Terracotta plant watering spike. We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

Edible Landscape In Troughs

There are large galvanized water troughs sat up on a layer of terrace stones on either side of the porch entrance.  Into one of those troughs I planted carrots for their pretty lacy greenery and spinach for it’s chunky crinkly texture.  I also transplanted a crown of asparagus for it’s light ferny look.  And of course another of my sister’s gifted lavender plants.

Galvanized trough planting. Terracotta plant watering spike. We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

In the other trough I planted the lacy-carrot border as well, but anchored it with garlic bulbs pulled from my grandmother’s home almost 20 years ago. Sentimental food!

Galvanized trough planting. Terracotta plant watering spike. We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

I also wanted a jalapeno plant in this trough planter.  It’ll be convenient when RancherMan’s grilling.  We love roasted jalapenos and now he can harvest & grill a few right then, right there!  I have a *terracotta watering spike to keep the jalapeno watered.  I thought the Dos XX bottle was apropos!

Terracotta plant watering spike. We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

Even the wood mulch I added for a finished look was free!  So with gifted extra plants, transplants from other areas, researching soil companies, using credit card points for the stone and finding free bark mulch, this entire landscaping job was minuscule to our budget!

Rainwater Catchment System

To tie into my galvanized theme, RancherMan set up a rainwater catchment system using another galvanized water trough.

We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

We have a split gutter here, one side goes into the rain catchment, the other side to the ground. When the trough fills up we can move the lever to have rainwater rerouted away & into a splash block, where it will drain into the grass.

He even built a wood-slat hinged top for it and used a horseshoe for the handle. Thank you RancherMan! I simply dip my watering can into the water & I’m steps away from keeping my landscaping watered for free!

Keeping Bermuda Grass OUT!

Another feature is this grass block I love. If you’ve ever dealt with Bermuda grass, you know what a challenge it can be to keep it out of your beds.  RancherMan & I installed a Bermuda-Grass Barrier.

We needed to landscape our porch area. But soil and plants are expensive! Come see how I landscaped it beautifully on the cheap. #TexasHomesteader

So far has been 100% effective at keeping that dang Bermuda grass from encroaching on all my plantings.  #canyoubelieveit??!!

~TxH~

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4 thoughts on “Landscaping An Outdoor Oasis On The Cheap

  1. Nancy

    This looks beautiful! I was recently given a strawberry plant and the same person has put a few yellow alpine strawberry babies in a pot to root for me. I’m very excited about getting them (although living in an apartment, they will stay in pots). Her husband made her a couple (3 high) stairstep beds for her strawberries and they look great! We visited for a few days and Kaleigh loved going out and picking them. Very few made it into the house, though. If she found a more than usual flavorful one she would share. Good luck with your new “playgrounds”.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I love strawberries too, Nancy. But I’ve never really grown them. Glad you and Kaleigh enjoyed picking berries, but when you say “very few made it into the house…” Really, can you blame her?? LOL! ~TxH~

      Reply
  2. Pam

    Your porch and plantings are looking great. The front of our house faces south and gets extremely hot which limits what we an grow there during our short Michigan summers. This year I added coneflowers which love the heat and can handle dry conditions. I borrowed some purple coneflower from a plant I started from seed a few years ago and bought orange, pink and yellow coneflowers and placed them so purple was every other color. Coneflowers are not expensive but I was happy to save a few dollars by splitting up what I had. My mom has given me plants from her yard over the years. She recently gave me a peony plant that was passed from my great grandma to my grandma so I am really excited to add that to my yard! To save even more I now ask for plants for my birthday and Mothers Day. I get a new blueberry bush for Mothers Day and my birthday plant is whatever I want that year. That way I get a gift I can enjoy for years for years to come!

    Reply

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