Recipe: Honeysuckle Jelly – Childhood Memories In A Jar

by Texas Homesteader ~

Here  in NE Texas the honeysuckle is blooming.  Aaaahhh sweet childhood memories of my siblings and me standing around a honeysuckle vine under that blue sky, pulling the fragrant flowers and sucking the sweet honey from the blooms. I decided to make honeysuckle jelly so I could taste those wonderful memories.

Honeysuckle Jelly - Childhood Memories In A Jar! This jelly made with the blossoms of honeysuckle tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child #TexasHomesteader

Harvesting And Preparing Honeysuckle Blossoms

I have very limited honeysuckle vines here on the homestead. But thankfully my mother has a bumper crop. This jelly is so popular with my family that I wanted to make a double batch. So I harvested about 4 cups of honeysuckle flowers at her house and brought them home.  First I took each flower and cut the tiny green bulb from the base of each of the blooms.  This leaves only the petals and the nectar.

Preparing Honeysuckle Blossoms. This honeysuckle jelly made with the blossoms of honeysuckle tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child - absolutely delicious! #TexasHomesteader

Making A Blossom Infusion

Since I’ll eventually make a double batch of this delicious jelly, I go ahead & make double the infusion. After rinsing the blossoms in a colander I boiled 4 cups of water in a large saucepan and removed the pan from the heat.  I added the honeysuckle flowers and replaced the cover on the pan.

The blossoms steeped for about 45 minutes, with me stirring every 15 minutes or so.  This makes a blossom infusion.

Breathe deeply and smell that wonderful aroma…

Blossom Infusion. This honeysuckle jelly made with the blossoms of honeysuckle tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child - absolutely delicious! #TexasHomesteader

Making The Honeysuckle Jelly

I strained the petals from the water and put the petals in my compost. I put 2 cups of infusion in my refrigerator for the future 2nd batch.

I should caution here that trying to double the recipe at one time can result in failure of the mixture to jell properly.  Only make one batch at a time, don’t try to do a double batch at one time.

I don’t know why this keeps the jelly from thickening, but in my experience it does.  Instead of jelly you will have “Honeysuckle Honey”. It’s still delicious just not thick.  Ask me how I know…  Eh hem!

So in my saucepan I returned the other two cups of blossom infusion & added 1/4 cup lemon juice and 4 cups of sugar.  The mixture was stirred until the sugar was completely dissolved.

Then I turned the heat on medium high and brought the infusion to a boil.  I brought it to a hard boil that could not be stirred down (220 degrees). Then I added the liquid pectin and set the timer for two minutes.

After the infusion boiled those last two minutes I removed the pan from the heat.  The hot jelly was ladled into hot sanitized half-pint canning jars. Of course the rim of each jar was wiped clean of any drips. Then I placed a two-part canning lid/ring onto each jar, tightening only until medium snug.

Water-Bath Canning

I placed the jars of hot jelly into the rack of my water-bath canner and lowered them into the boiling water completely covering the jars by 1″ of water. Then I placed the lid on the canner.

After the water returned to a rolling boil I set the timer for 5 minutes. When the timer went off I carefully lifted the jars out of the canner and set them onto a tea towel to cool.

Testing The Canning Seal

After 24 hours you can test the seal to make sure it sealed correctly by gently pressing the middle of the flat lid.  If it makes a plinky noise when pressed, the jar did not seal. In those cases put that jar in the fridge and consume the contents quickly.  All of mine sealed just fine.  The jars from this honeysuckle jelly just look like they contain summer sunshine, do they not?

This honeysuckle jelly tastes just like the blossoms I remember as a child – absolutely delicious.  Give it a try!  For more updates, follow me on Facebook.

* * * * * * * * * *

NOTE: One of our readers recently suggested that his extension agent told him that some honeysuckle is ‘toxic’. Of course I did my own research (only .edu and extension sites, not ‘opinion’ sites) and then went to my own extension agent with the specific question. The correspondence in part was:

ME:

What I’ve read has said that the nectar from the honeysuckle plant can be ingested without harm (same as you mentioned below) but regarding varieties that can be considered ‘toxic’ in large quantities, I’m reading that is only stems and berries, NOT the honeysuckle flower or nectar. 

EXTENSION AGENT:

I agree. I am only searching .edu  and/or Cooperative Extension sites. When there is a suggestion of toxicity, it is in children and is the berries.  Here is an example.

http://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weedguide/single_weed.php?id=54

So my understanding is that honeysuckle blooms & nectar can be consumed without harm (aside from any allergies or special circumstances) But if you have any question at all, seek the advice of your own extension agent / doctor.

Now, on to the recipe!

5 from 7 votes
Print

Honeysuckle Blossom Jelly

Yields 6 Half-Pint Jars.  This smooth jelly tastes just like those sweet blossoms you enjoyed as a kid.  It's like childhood memories in a jar!

Author www.TexasHomesteader.com

Ingredients

  • 2 Cups Prepared Honeysuckle Blossoms
  • 2 Cups Boiling Water
  • 4 Cups Sugar
  • 1/4 Cup Lemon Juice
  • 1 3-oz Pkg Liquid Pectin

Instructions

  1. To make an infusion, first prepare the flowers by removing the tiny green tip at the base of each blossom.

  2. Next, bring 2 cups of water to a boil in a large saucepan, turn the heat off. Add the honeysuckle blossoms & stir, then cover the pan. Allow them to steep for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally.

    (note: I’ve refrigerated the cooled infusion containing the blossoms overnight, and although the infusion was dark green when I strained it, the jelly ended up golden yellow and even more intensely flavored…)

  3. Strain the flowers from the liquid. Measure two cups of the infusion and return it to the saucepan. (if volume boiled down in making the infusion you can add a little water to make up the 2 cups)

  4. Add lemon juice and sugar and turn heat to medium high, stirring constantly. Bring the infusion to a hard boil that won’t stir down. (220 degrees)

  5. Add the pectin and boil for two minutes. Reduce heat if necessary to avoid boiling over – the mixture will rise quite a bit when it’s boiling so it’s best to use an over-sized pan.

Recipe Notes

To Water-Bath Can:  Ladle jelly into hot, sterilized jars, and screw on canning lids. Place jars in boiling water of a water-bath canner for 5 minutes. Remove jars and place on a towel, out of drafts and allow to cool for 24 hours. After 24 hrs test the lids to make sure the jars are properly sealed.

~TxH~

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157 thoughts on “Recipe: Honeysuckle Jelly – Childhood Memories In A Jar

  1. Amy Austin

    Hi, I live in NC and I have made your jelly recipe several times. My family and friends love it and request more every year. Thanks for sharing the recipe. Anyway, I gave a jar to friend of mine who worked for our local coooperative extension office and she told me that there was no tested recipe and that the jelly is not acidic and thus increases the risk of food borne illness. She said it needs to be refrigerated and consumed within a few days after making it. I told her I had been making it for years this way and had never had a problem. I was wondering if you had any insight or comments as to what she said.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Interesting… I’d assumed it wasn’t an acid acting as a preservative in jelly, but the sugar. Although I’m not saying she’s wrong by any stretch, I’ve never heard this advice. And like you, I’ve made this blossom jelly for years. I’ve even happily consumed the canned product over a year after processing. (I’m not suggesting anyone else do that of course, just my experience.) That being said, it’s important to do your own research & be comfortable with the information and how you use it. But in our household at least, nothing changes. I’ll continue making & canning this delicious jelly for us and as gifts. ~TxH~

      Reply
  2. Momma Lisa

    This is my first time making honeysuckle jelly. I double the batch though. My jelly was setting long before I could get the jars into the water bath. Thank you! I really enjoy this jelly.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Wow, that’s awesome. My jelly always had a hard time setting up when I tried to double it (maybe I should try again because it’s so convenient) Glad you like the jelly as much as we do! ~TxH~

      Reply
  3. Mary Read

    I’m looking forward to making this soon! Question: does doubling the recipe affect the outcome? For example using 4 cups of honeysuckle, 8 cups sugar, etc… thanks!

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      In my experience, doubling the recipe (for whatever reason) seems to negatively affect the outcome. It seems to keep it from setting correctly. I have no idea why. So I never double the batch. I often make enough infusion for two batches but only make one batch at a time. ~TxH~

      Reply
  4. Debra Y Mathis

    First of all, the recipe is confusing because you indicate 4 cups of infusion and 4 cups of sugar. But then you say only used two cups of the infusion bought imply that you will use four cups of sugar with two cups of infusion. It does seem like a lot of sugar, not the normal ratio, so it is concerning. The second thing is, no, not all honeysuckle is edible. I’ve already had a talk with my local Extension Office guy, and he thinks all honeysuckle should be treated as inedible because some of it is toxic. Specifically, he says that the honeysuckle that is red or pink or white and red is toxic. As a child that grew up sucking on honeysuckle flowers both in New Mexico and Texas, I found this information disappointing but personally I believe it is not totally correct. I believe the white honeysuckle that turns yellow is edible. I have another type of honeysuckle that came up in my garden that has white and red flowers, and when I tasted it it was not sweet at all. Since I did just make honeysuckle jelly with the sweet honeysuckle I have that is white first then yellow, I am making a judgment call and assuming that one is edible and the other is not.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Thanks for your comment Debra. For years I’ve made this recipe with rave reviews using 2 cups of infusion to 4 cups of sugar. You could certainly try less sugar when you make it if that ratio sounds better for you. And if you make 4 cups of infusion you’ll still have half the infusion left for a second batch later too to see which sugar quantity you prefer in the finished product. (don’t try to do a double batch at one time) I’m thinking I may just edit the recipe & lower the infusion amount to 2 cups needed instead of making 4 cups of infusion to allow for evaporation and/or the 2nd batch. I’ll try to word things to make it more clear to my readers.

      I’ve never heard that some honeysuckle blossoms could be considered toxic and my research shows that honeysuckle blossoms (as used in my recipe) are considered safe but some honeysuckle vines & berries are considered mildly toxic if consumed in large quantities. (vines/berries are not used in my recipe) So I’ll contact my extension agent immediately for clarification. When she responds I’ll be sure to make that note in this post as well.

      Thanks for bringing these points to my attention.

      ~TxH~

      Reply
  5. Michell T

    5 stars
    Made this in 2017, making it again right now. It’s a great recipe! This year I found some coral honeysuckle so I’m using that as well!

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      We love it too Michell. I’ve never made it with coral honeysuckle but I too have found some blooming this year. Be sure to share how you like it with the coral mixed in!! ~TxH~

      Reply
  6. Judy

    I LOVE honeysuckle!! I used to suck the drop of honey juice when I was a kid too. I have never heard of making jelly from them. I have read through the comments and many have a problem of boiling over. I’m not sure if this works with jelly making but if you put a wooden spoon across the middle of the pot it won’t boil over. I do this all the time cooking and it truly works. I hope someone will try with making jelly and post about their results. Thank you for sharing this awesome recipe. I will be cooking up some when they come back in bloom!!

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I’ve heard of the spoon trick when boiling pasta and such Judy, not sure I’ve ever heard of it being used with jelly making. I typically make sure to use an oversized pot when making jelly to eliminate a boil-over problem. ~TxH~

      Reply
      1. Judy

        Thank you for answering. I also use the larger pot, but have wondered if the spoon trick would work . Thank you for this wonderful recipe and am definitely going to make next year!

        Reply
  7. Kathy B.

    5 stars
    I tried this recipe and it tastes yummy! The only problem I had was it set up so fast that I have bubbles in the jelly that I could not get out. Should I reheat and repour the jelly? Also, the recipe calls for one pouch liquid pectin. My pouches were 3 oz. Was that too much pectin? Thank you, hope someone has the answers!

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I’ve never had mine set up too quickly Kathy, if anything I’ve had to stir longer to get it to set. Maybe a difference in heat level? (my liquid pouches are 3 oz as well) But I have had to rework jelly in the past and I can say it’s never given me satisfactory results. Better than the non-set jelly I had, but certainly not the jelly I was after. So I’d say unless the jelly is inedible the way it is, enjoy it in its current state. ~TMH~

      Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Ya know Rebecca, I’m not sure but I can share my own experience. Supposedly you can substitute powdered pectin for liquid by either mixing it into the sugar before adding to your recipe or adding water to powdered pectin & boiling for a short time before using. But I’ve tried those substitutes on a couple of occasions and my jelly did not set. Maybe it was the kind of lemon juice I was using at the time (which I know has caused a problem in the past) or maybe something else and it was just coincidence. But I always use liquid pectin in this honeysuckle jelly because DANG there’s already been so much effort put in with harvesting of all those flowers and cutting off the tiny bulbs of each & every one of them. Maybe more veteran jelly makers can weigh in here? ~TMH~

      Reply
  8. Patty Abate

    According to your recipe, the actual jelly is made with 2c infusion to 4c sugar. That sounds like a lot of sugar! Most wild flower jelly recipes I have seen called for equal amounts sugar and liquids.
    If you use 4c water to make the infusion, then only 2c of that to make they jelly… why not just use 2c water to make the infusion? Then you wouldn’t have leftover infusion.
    Thanks !patty

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I’ve made this jelly almost every year for decades now, this is just how I make it and it always turns out delicious. Regarding your question about the amount of infusion – in my post I explain why I only use half: “I should caution here that trying to double the recipe can result in failure of the mixture to jell properly. If you want to save the extra infusion and make more jelly, put it aside and do one batch at a time. Don’t try to do a double batch now. I don’t know why this keeps the jelly from thickening, but it does. In that case instead of jelly you will have “Honeysuckle Honey” – still delicious just not thick. Ask me how I know… Eh hem!” But ya know, if you try it differently & like the way it turns out – let us know! ~TMH~

      Reply
  9. Kim

    5 stars
    Hi! I was wondering if the lemon juice makes the jelly tart? I made violet jelly, as well as dandelion, each calling for 2 tbsp. I found it to be quite tart. Any way to let more of the natural flavor shine? Ty!!

    Reply
  10. Tina

    5 stars
    Tammy, have you ever combined and made Honeysuckle/Clover jelly? I have made and liked both but I’m considering combining for a batch and see how it turns out?

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Ya know, Tina… I love both jellies as well. But the honeysuckle jelly is so powerfully honeysuckle flavored – to me that’s the real benefit of that jelly in my opinion. Although delicious as well, the clover jelly is a much more subtle flavored jelly. I’ve never combined the two before but I think I’d probably prefer them separately. ~TMH~

      Reply
  11. Mark

    I noticed that you only use 2 cups of the infusion at a time. What do you do with the leftover infusion. Do you add more gelatin to make another batch

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I often splash just a little extra water in when I’m measuring so I have two batches worth of infusion. I never make both batches at the same time, but often one right after another. I never throw away the extra infusion, it’s always turned into another batch of honeysuckle jelly! ~TMH~

      Reply
  12. lydia

    5 stars
    we made this last year and loved it. we are getting ready to make some today and i am hoping to get another couple of patches in later this week. i was wondering if there is some way to make a sugar free version? thanks for a great keeper recipe.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Someone else asked about this Lydia, but I’ve always made this honeysuckle jelly per the recipe. Maybe someone who has tried & succeeded in making it sugar free can weigh in? ~TMH~

      Reply
  13. Danielle Peck

    5 stars
    I made this recipe today and it’s delicious! I used powdered pectin and it was set up almost as soon as I had it in the jars. I used Sure-Gel brand and stirred it into the infusion before it came to a boil then added the sugar. It came out perfectly.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      That is so good to know Danielle – THANKS! I don’t know why I couldn’t get it to set up with the powdered stuff but I may try again based on your success. ~TMH~

      Reply
  14. Catherine M. Williams Kleinwort

    5 stars
    Hello,
    Are all honeysuckles edible? There are no wild ones around here but you buy the bush at the nursery so I am thinking it would be the same, no? I have the red in my garden but would look for a yellow unless you can use either one!
    Thanks
    Catherine

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I’m *assuming* all honeysuckle is edible Catherine. I know it’s dangerous to just go eating plants if you’re not sure, so if you buy one it would probably be a good idea to run the botanical name through your extension agent for verification. But I don’t think the color of the honeysuckle blossom makes a difference. I typically pick whatever mom has growing on her vines and they’re usually anywhere from white to yellow to salmon colored. ~TMH~

      Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I’m not a honeysuckle aficionado Carrie so I don’t know if “Coral Honeysuckle” is a type of honeysuckle or just a color of the blossoms, but I’ve made the honeysuckle jelly with the various colors that grace my mother’s honeysuckle plants and it’s always turned out delicious! ~TMH~

      Reply
  15. Countrymama

    Made this, omitted the lemon juice and added 1/4 cup more of the infusion instead (since fruit pectin has a lemon flavor already). Mine came out more of a honey consistency. Don’t know why since I followed cooking directions and have been making different jellies for many years and never had a problem like that. Anyways I’m fine with honeysuckle honey since the taste is awesome.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I’ve had batches come out as a honey consistency too Countrymama – in my case it was because I was trying to use powdered pectin liquefied to take the place of the liquid pectin. I still used that honey on my toast and such and it was still delicious, just thinner than jelly. I’ve been much more successful obtaining the correct consistency when I use liquid pectin.

      Reply
      1. Texas Homesteader Post author

        That is awesome advice Nancy, thank you! I’ve also heard that sometimes if the jelly doesn’t set up right away it does a couple of weeks later and I’ve seen that work sometimes too. Yea! ~TMH~

        Reply
    2. Christy

      It’s possible that your jelly was honey-like consistency because the reaction of the pectin is dependent on the pH of the product. I suggest this since you said you omitted the lemon juice. The lower pH from the addition of lemon juice is also a safety consideration. Fruit jellies have a naturally low pH which assists in the prevention of Clostridium botulinum toxin formation.

      Reply
  16. Lisa @ Fun Money Mom

    I’ll be completely honest with you… I didn’t even know honeysuckle was edible (I’m a bit of a city girl). Now you have me so curious and I really want to try it! Thanks so much for sharing with us at Share The Wealth Sunday!

    Reply
  17. Elaine

    I never knew you could use honeysuckle for a jelly…I remember eating them as a kid!! Thanks for sharing on My 2 favorite Things on Thursday!! Hope to see you again tomorrow!! Pinned!!

    Reply
  18. Gina

    Oh my gosh! I want some of this right now!! I remember sucking the honey out of those blossoms from the bush by our fence as a kid. It’s one of the most vivid summer memories I have! I didn’t know that you could make honey or jelly out of the blossoms!! This is a game changer and I am so ready to give this recipe a try! I’ve pinned this to try it out later. 🙂

    Reply
  19. Krista

    Well this surprised me. I didn’t think you could make jelly from honeysuckle flowers. It looks wonderful. Now I need to go search for some.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I’ve made it for many years Krista and it’s always delicious. This is the most popular post on my entire blog so I’m guessing others are enjoying it as well. Gotta love it. ~TMH~

      Reply
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  21. Jon

    That makes sense because when I made the spring batch the flowers were mature, almost wilted whereas the summer batch the blooms were just opening or not long opened.

    I’ll let the remaining flowers mature and make another batch then report on it.

    Reply
  22. Jon

    Hello. I made this in the spring and LOVED it. The honeysuckle started blooming again so I decided to make another batch. This time the infusion DID NOT turn green! I made it anyways because I didn’t want to waste it. In the spring I used white and yellow flowers but this time I used exclusively white(mainly because there was more of them than yellow). Could this be the reason for it? It didn’t turn golden like the first batch, more like a clear/pale color. I’m sure it will get eaten regardless but just wondering.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      My honeysuckle jelly often ends up various shades of yellow when it’s complete. I wonder if the variation has to do with the maturity (or immaturity) of the blossoms chosen? Seems logical to me anyway. ~TMR~

      Reply
  23. Suzanne Smiley

    O-K! I have now made FIVE batches of this stuff and I gotta say, it’s just great! I started out picking four cups of blossoms at a friend’s house. The first two cups of infusion yielded 2 1/2 pints. It was amazing and perfect and the cans sealed first try. The second two cups were not so good. I tried to make it sugar free with stevia. Big mistake! It yielded only a pint and a half and never jelled. But you’re right, honeysuckle honey is just as good! I’ve been using it to sweeten my green iced tea! The biggest problem was that it all went too fast! I had to make more.

    My second picking of honeysuckle was out along a bike trail near my house. I brought a gallon ziplock bag with me and ended up with SIX cups of blossoms! Woo-hoo! Three batches! The third batch I tried making with the zest you mentioned. I think it will be tasty, but I was never able to get it to that rolling boil I had with the first two batches. See, I kept having to turn down the heat, the previous two times, or risk it boiling over. So this time I chose a larger pot, and realized, too late, that I had to turn up the burner that much more. I hope that batch jells.

    The fourth and fifth batches, I made back to back and I had jelly on my stirring spoon by the time I was done, so I’m pretty sure they worked! I’ll find out tomorrow for sure if all the cans sealed. I’ve learned that there is nothing more satisfying than hearing that *plink* in the lids after you remove them from the boiling water. 😀

    Thank you for showing me that canning isn’t so scary and is a fun and rewarding experience! I can’t wait to make black raspberry jam, with the wild plants in my yard, and start canning salsa with my garden vegetables later this summer!

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      OMGoodness Suzanne – You. Go. GIRL!! By the bye… honeysuckle jelly makes fantastic homemade Christmas gifts too so if possible set some back to use for gifts. They’re always well received and folks beg for them every year. I’m so excited about your honeysuckle excursions! ~TMR~

      Reply
  24. Suzanne Smiley

    I’m in the middle of trying this recipe right now! I had a question, though. If I can’t make it all in one day, what’s the best place to stop? I’m making the blossom infusion right now. Should I leave the blossoms in or take them out before I refrigerate for the night? I was going to take them out until I read that you left them in and refrigerated before. Does it matter? I’m waiting for my canning lids and liquid pectin to come in the mail tomorrow.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Suzanne, I often make the infusion one day and the jelly the next. You can strain the blossoms and place the infusion in the fridge until you’re ready to make your jelly. This year I did something different – I’d heard you can let your infusion set in the fridge overnight with your blossoms to intensify the flavor so I placed the infusion – blossoms and all – in the fridge until the next day. I was very distressed to see the vibrant green color of my infusion the next morning! (despite my removal of all the tiny green bulbs at the base of each and every blossom beforehand) I was then very pleasantly surprised to see that when my jelly was made it changed from the vibrant green to the beautiful sunshiny yellow you see in the picture. Can’t say I understand it, but… Oh, and the jelly was delicious! ~TMR~

      Reply
  25. Beverly Henderson

    I was wondering,if I use the powdered kind of pectin,when do I add? Going to try this some time this week,lol,need to know asap,lol,thanks for sharing 🙂

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Beverly I’ve made this jelly with powdered pectin before, but only with marginal success. I’ve had trouble getting it to gel properly when using the powdered but have never had a problem when using the liquid. When using the powdered pectin I just followed the directions on the box & integrated it into my honeysuckle jelly recipe. I will say that when it didn’t really jell properly I still used it as “honeysuckle honey” and it was still delicious, just not jelly.~TMR~

      Reply
  26. Stephen Robinson

    I have a honeysuckle bush behind my garden. I will try this along with plum wine and plum jelly from my plum tree. Thx for sharing.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I don’t have much honeysuckle here Stephen, I think the cattle keep it eaten down. But my mom always gives me the heads-up when the honeysuckle is blooming and she shares with me. This jelly makes GREAT gifts, by the way. ~TMR~

      Reply
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  29. Emi

    Hello, I would like to try this recipe, but I have very limited honeysuckle. Is it possible to freeze the blossoms until I can get 4 cups?

    Thank you,

    Emi

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Hummm… I wouldn’t Emi, I don’t think the integrity of the blossoms will hold up to freezing/thawing to make a proper infusion. What I would do is make the infusion using the same (-ish) ratio and freeze the infusion until you get the quantity called for in the recipe. ~TMR~

      Reply
      1. Emi

        Thank you for the advice! I did as you said and made 1/2 the infusion and froze it… It was delicious and my family has been talking about it from the first taste! Luckily my honeysuckle vines bloomed again and I collected all the blossoms for another try 🙂 I now have enough to last until next summer and a few for gifts! I will definitely be looking at your blog for more delicious recipes 🙂

        Reply
  30. Angela

    Hi! I love the idea of trying something like this! Do you have any ideas for someone living in the city who doesn’t have access to honeysuckle? Do you think the dried blossoms from the health food store would work or is there an infusion out there one could try?

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Actually Angela, most of the honeysuckle I’ve seen has been in the cities – people like to grow it along their fences. I’ve never heard of dried blossoms but I can’t imagine that would be very effective since it’s primarily that little drop of honey inside the fresh blooms that lends the sweet taste of childhood to this jelly. Maybe ask your family, friends or neighbors if they know anyone with honeysuckle vines? Believe me, it’s worth the effort. ~TMR~

      Reply
  31. Jen

    You make it look so easy! I’ve never made any kind of jelly or canned good, but I want to try this. I have a ton of honeysuckle growing out in my yard and even the smell of it makes me happy!

    Reply
  32. Lois Baker

    I have got to try the honeysuckle jelly. Sounds delicious. I live down south with honeysuckle aplenty. Couple of questions: when your recipe calls for 1package liquid pectin are you using 1 envelope or 1 box of 2 envelopes?
    Does boiling the jelly for two minutes give you a soft set like jam or a firm set like jelly? Thanks

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Lois, I use 1 envelope and follow the directions. A couple of warnings – don’t try to double this recipe, it won’t set correctly for some reason when it’s doubled. I do save the leftover infusion and make two batches instead one double batch. And although it’s said there’s a way to use dry pectin in place of the liquid pectin I’ve never been successful with it. (I’m remaking a batch today because I tried again with the dry pectin because that’s what I had. sigh…) This recipe makes a pretty soft jelly so it’s easy to stir into yogurt or spread onto toast – I absolutely love it. Give ‘er a try & let me know how you like it. ~TMR~

      Reply
  33. Wendy

    I was going to try to make some honeysuckle jelly. My family and I picked the honeysuckle, I boiled it, and let it sit in the refrigerator for a couple of days. When I tasted the water/juice, it had a not so good aftertaste. It almost tasted soapy, however, I’m sure I rinsed my container well. I was also afraid it would taste too much like perfume.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Wow Wendy, that’s not anything like I experienced – it was absolutely DELICIOUS. Make sure to cut off all the tiny green bulbs at the end of each bloom before steeping in water. ~TMR~

      Reply
  34. Nancy W

    I’ll be it tastes like sunshine in a jar! Thanks for sharing on the HomeAcre Hop! Love seeing your posts on the Hop! – Nancy The HomeAcre Hop

    Reply
  35. villarosa

    Ah honeysuckle… takes me back to my grandmother’s farm & garden!! Thanks for sharing recipe. We do not use sugar, might you know if I could use a more natural sweetener for this recipe? Thank you for sharing! BTW, I love your blog. You are in our neck of the woods ~Smile….

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Well thank you for the compliment, and a big Howdy Neighbor from us! I only make the recipe as written and it works beautifully for me, but I’m assuming you can use any recipe that uses a blossom infusion. If you give it a try let me know how it turns out! ~TMR~

      Reply
  36. ColleenB.~Texas

    I so enjoy making jams and jelly’s but have never heard of honeysuckle jelly before. Sounds rather interesting and would like to try and make a batch but…………….what I need is the honeysuckle.
    Thanks for the recipe along with good, detailed instructions.
    (I saved and printed out the recipe for future use……….just in case I come along and find some honeysuckle)
    Adding the recipe to my canning recipe binder. :}

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      We have precious little honeysuckle here as well Colleen, but thankfully my mom has a bumper crop. She was totally enamored with the jelly last year so she’s begged me to come make it this year at her house so she can learn how to do it too. I’m not gonna lie, it’s delicious! ~TMR~

      Reply
  37. Pingback: Tumble-Back Tuesday - Honeysuckle Jelly

  38. Marilyn

    One more thing…if your jelly tends to boil over during the hard boil phase after adding the sugar, then you should use a deeper kettle, not reduce the heat. 😉

    Reply
  39. Marilyn

    Sounds like a good jelly idea!! I just have some confusion about some of your methods….I have been making jelly for years. With all the sugar and citrus (acid) you are adding, I don’t think you have to put them in a boiling water bath at all. Follow the directions on the insert that comes with the pectin. Also, the instructions say to add the pectin with the mix early on, and when you bring that to a boil, then you add the sugar all at once and bring it to a second, hard boil for 1 minute. Then pour into clean sterilized jars, up to 1/8 inch from the top of the jar. The level in your jars is way below that. I also like the idea that they now suggest where you turn the jars upside down for 5 minutes after sealing them tightly.
    Sorry, I am not trying to be picky, don’t mean to offend you.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      No offense at all Marilyn. And yes, I learned to always over-size the pan I’m cooking my jelly in so it won’t boil over. I’ve read that you can turn sealed jars of hot jelly upside down and they would seal and I often do that when I’m making the jelly for just RancherMan & I. I guess I just want to be doubly safe if making for others. And I filled the jars to the levels that they all might be the same when I ran out of jelly in the pan instead of all full and one half full. WHEW! Think that covers everything. Thanks for your comments Marilyn! ~TMR~

      Reply
  40. Kathy

    Looks beautiful and I’ll bet it tastes like a summer day! I am going to try it as soon as the honeysuckle starts blooming again. You can do the same thing with dandelions. Exact same recipe only using dandelion blossoms, taking care to take off all the bitter green parts. I found it easier to just nip off the blossoms with my fingernails as opposed to cutting them off. Strain through cheesecloth. Great project with the kiddos!

    Reply
  41. Christina

    I loved honeysuckle as a kid!!! Thanks for linking up at the Thursday SWEET HAUTE Share linky party, hope you stop by every week! I really appreciate your support and encouragement .
    http://sweethaute.blogspot.com/2013/09/thursday-sweet-haute-share.html
    You still have time, the link is still open!!!!

    Be Sweet~
    Christina at
    SWEET HAUTE

    Reply
  42. SherryO

    This sounds amazing! I just love honeysuckle and imagine the jelly is divine! Thanks for sharing at Super Sunday Link Party at Who Needs A Cape? Be sure to stop back for more linky fun!

    Reply
  43. Kristin

    I love the smell of honeysuckle, but never thought of making it into a jelly! Such a great idea. Followed you from the Homestead Barn Hop.
    Love for you to come by Wildcrafting Wednesday and share.
    http://www.herbanmomma.com/2013/08/wildcrafting-wednesday-8-28-13/

    Reply
  44. Marilyn

    I’ve never thought to make honeysuckle jelly! What an amazing and gourmet recipe! I LOVE IT! I’m currently hosting an awesome spice giveaway along with a “preserving the summer” recipe link party and I’d love for you to stop by and share this great recipe!

    http://www.4you-withlove.com/2013/08/party-thyme-preserving-summer-link.html

    Have a fabulous day!

    Marilyn

    Reply
  45. Cynthia L.

    I am on my way to find some honeysuckle. I have never heard of this jelly before. You make it sound very delicious though.

    Thanks for sharing at the In and Out of the Kitchen Link party. See you soon!

    Reply
  46. Laura Graham

    Our honeysuckle is over for this year. I thank you for the recipe, and I will try it next summer. They are so plentiful here in NE SC. I used to suck them up when I was a child. It seems like it would rinse out some of the ‘honey’ to rinse after cutting the green bottom off. I don’t think I will rinse at all. I came here from the clever chicks blog hop.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Well welcome Laura – glad you stopped by! I really should rinse the blossoms before I cut the tip off – I just wanted to wash off any debris from birds flying over, etc. LOL Next time I think I’ll rinse them first, let them air dry, then cut off the green bulb. Hummmm… ~TMR~

      Reply
  47. Pingback: Honey, Let's Talk Honeysuckle! - Scratch Mommy

  48. Pingback: June Forage: Japanese Honeysuckle | musings of a kitchen witch

  49. Sue from theT2women

    Love this! There’s a new link-up party going on at One Sharendipity Place and we would love for you to join us! Here’s the link if you want to come: http://thet2women.com/welcome-to-one-sharendipity-place-link-up-4/

    Reply
  50. Summers Acres

    Just stopping by to let you know that you are being featured tomorrow on The HomeAcre Hop. Come by and visit us again and grab the featured button.

    http://summersacres.blogspot.com/2013/05/the-homeacre-hop-21.html

    Reply
  51. Summers Acres

    We do not have any honeysuckles at the house. But we were out at the land we recently bought and there was some there. You’ve got me thinking now! Thanks for sharing!

    Please join us again Thursday at:
    The HomeAcre Hop

    ~Ann

    Reply
  52. Pingback: Making a Home - Homemaking Linky - Linda's Lunacy

  53. Katharina

    All done already! 🙂 I think it may be that our honeysuckle time is almost over, or my lemon juice is too strong, or both, but I’ll use less lemon juice next time.

    For those like me that don’t have liquid pectin on hand – I found that one is supposed to use 6 tbsp of regular powdered pectin for one 3oz pouch of liquid. It’s quite infuriating that even in the Ball canning books and recipes, no conversion or amount in oz/tsp/tbsp is given…. but now I’m on a tangent 🙂

    It looks like honey in jars. I’m baking some bread now….

    Reply
  54. Pingback: The Creative HomeAcre Hop #17

  55. Alison Bayne

    Thanks for sharing these detailed and clear instructions over at The Creative Home Acre Blog Hop. See you again at http://mumtopia.blogspot.com/2013/05/homeacrehop26thMay.html

    Reply
  56. Anne Payne

    Looks fabulous and I love the smell of honeysuckle. I remember sucking on the blossoms as a child. We have an abundance of the stuff in our yard! I wonder if this would help with allergies, too. They say eating local honey does. Thanks for posting your recipe.

    Reply
  57. Rhonda

    I’m always looking for more unique jams/jelly recipes. This one certainly fits, I just wish we had honeysuckle around here. Have you previously posted any other jam or jelly recipes? I’d love to check them out. So far this year I’ve made dandelion jelly, Strawberry Basil jam, Smoky spice berry jam, mandarin orange marmalade, and this weekend I’m making apricot. Actually, it seems like it’s becoming a bit of an addiction, but that’s only because I enjoy it so much! 🙂

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Rhonda, adding recipes to my posts is a relatively recent addition so I don’t think I’ve featured any other jelly/jams. My other favorite jelly to make is with fruit from our wild plum trees – I was delighted with the results. Unfortunately the drought in 2011 took many of my beloved trees and the consecutive drought of 2012 weakened the remaining trees. I have seen a handful of blooms this year but I don’t think I’ll get a crop to make jelly. But I’ll be posting recipes here each Friday to send folks into the weekend with happy thoughts of good eatin’ so keep an eye out! ~TMR~

      Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Marlo, I thought I’d answer you here in case someone else had the same question. I’ve never made freezer jam of any kind so I can’t say for sure if the recipes are interchangeable. I’ve always water-bath canned my jams and jellies because even though I now own a water-bath canner, you don’t HAVE to – a large stock pot big enough to cover the jars with an additional inch of water and a trivet to keep the jars from sitting on the bottom of the pot is all you need. I’ve even made my own canner-bottom trivet by tying canning jar rings together with cotton string. LOL. Can anyone else weigh in and answer Marlo’s question? ~TMR~

      Reply
      1. Rachel R.

        I don’t see why not. Canning just preserves the jelly after it’s gelled, and freezer jelly doesn’t require that step because the freezer preserves it.

        (A freezer jelly recipe may or may not be safe to convert to canned, but canned to freezer should be fine.)

        Reply
  58. Marlo

    Interesting. I shall try it. Thanks for sharing your recipe. My husband has fond memories of honeysuckle in his grandfather’s garden. I think I will try this and give it to him for father’s day.

    Reply
  59. Bernideen's Tea Time Blog

    This is so unique. I too sucked the honeysuckle flowers as a child. My husband is quite allergic but I do think this is clever! I will print it out because later I will say “I wish I had”! I love to can and plan to take it up again in retirement! Would love to have you share this tomorrow at my “Open House”blog link party.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Thanks Bernideen – what a shame your hubby is allergic. The taste of this jelly is an amazing blast from childhood past – delicious. Thanks for the invite, I’ll see you then! ~TMR~

      Reply
  60. Linda@With A Blast

    The jelly has to taste amazing! And the recipe seems simple enough to make {now, this might be “last words spoken”!} thank you for sharing at our All My Bloggy Friends Party !

    Reply
  61. Nancy B.

    Reading the directions where you put the pectin in last really threw me for a loop, but when I read more carefully, I found that you were using liquid pectin. I usually use the powdered kind. I’ll have to give this a try. BTW, I live just north of Bug Tussle. Are you in Hunt County, or Fannin County?

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Nancy, I’ve been to Bug Tussle many times, I love the town. To answer your question, Wolfe City is in the very northern edge of Hunt County. Always nice to meet a neighbor! ~TMR~

      Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      Lois – now’s the time to gather the blossoms, honeysuckle blooms in the spring. You can prepare the blooms now and freeze them if you want to try making the jelly later in the year. ~TMR~

      Reply
  62. Terressa

    This is wonderful! I’ve never heard of anyone doing this. I’ve never made jelly, but I’m going to make this.

    Reply
      1. Cheryl roman

        I have a few questions about honeysuckle.. We picked a bunch of wild honeysuckle on my friends property.. It really didn’t smell .. And then I read how there is poisonous honeysuckle .. We live in northeast pa .. The honeysuckle is abundant…and the bees love it .. I went ahead and made the jelly but I’m afraid to eat it :-(( I feel like like a crazy loon but once you look things up online .. It gets very confusing .. We did pick them after dinner .. I don’t know if time of day makes a difference in taste or smell since they produce nectar at night… They look exactly like the ones on your site … Maybe I will try to send picture ..I make Lilac.. Violet.. Rose and lavender Jelly and I love the thought of honeysuckle to add to my collection .. Also .. Have you ever made wisteria jelly ??? Thank you

        Reply
        1. Texas Homesteader Post author

          I’ve never heard of poisonous honeysuckle-like plants Cheryl, but I know it’s important to ascertain the food you’re foraging is not poisonous. I’ve been helped on many occasions by our local extension agent. I send them pictures of leaves/flowers/fruit/bark and they have master naturalists properly identify my plant. (actually did that again this week for a wild plum tree on our property!) I’d recommend you do that as well if you’re concerned. I know the honeysuckle I always pick from my mother’s house is very fragrant and the resulting the jelly is powerfully honeysuckle scented and flavored. So your plant not having a strong honeysuckle scent makes me a little suspect. Let us know what you find out. ~TMR~

          Reply

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