Garden Update: Recovering in June

by Tammy Taylor~

Well guys, my garden was put behind schedule due to a naughty bull jumping the fence and trampling everything.  But it was all replanted quickly and has rebounded, albeit later in the season.  C’mon in and take a look!

A naughty bull jumped the garden fence and trampled everything. But it was all replanted quickly and has rebounded. #TaylorMadeHomestead

Our favorite fresh veggie to enjoy is green beans.  So I planted a row of heirloom green beans, and a week or two later planted another.  And another.  PLUS another!  The premise is that by the time the first row of beans is petering out, the others will be in production.  And it’s worked great!  RancherMan & I have enjoyed fresh green beans with almost every meal.

A naughty bull jumped the garden fence and trampled everything. But it was all replanted quickly and has rebounded. green beans #TaylorMadeHomestead

I’m not sure we can get tired of them but if we do they’ll be blanched and thrown in the freezer.  Let me tell ya, there’s not much more delight than green beans fresh from the garden that are cooked to tendercrisp instead of what usually comes in a can, which is way overcooked for my tastes.

But what about the rest of the garden.  Well, my spaghetti squash is really taking off.  Of course I started early looking for the dreaded Squash Bug Eggs.  I was told that if I wait until later in the season I wouldn’t have to deal with them much.  But I’ve found that information to be flawed.  They’re every bit as present as if I’d planted in early spring.

A naughty bull jumped the garden fence and trampled everything. But it was all replanted quickly and has rebounded. Squash bug eggs #TaylorMadeHomestead

So I deal with Squash Bugs the way I always do and I’ve not had much more trouble with them.  I know spaghetti squashes take longer to mature than summer squash or zucchini, but they also last much longer in storage.  So although I’m assured of having plenty of spaghetti squash for RancherMan & me, I’ll also have plenty to share in my weekly blessing basket too.

My tomatoes are growing like crazy but so far no fresh tomatoes.  Hopefully I get something before summer temps keep the fruit from setting. I planted heirloom Mariglobes this year & I’m much anticipating that burst of fresh tomato flavor.

The onions & garlic have been rocking it!  My walking onions have already put on their walking shoes and are providing me with next year’s harvest too.  How much I love that I don’t have to replant my onions every year, they replant themselves!

A naughty bull jumped the garden fence and trampled everything. But it was all replanted quickly and has rebounded. walking onions #TaylorMadeHomestead

The peppers are all doing fine, but not much to harvest yet.  I’ve seen a couple of tiny poblanos but no red bells nor anaheims.  I know they’re usually lpretty good about producing during summer months so I’m still anticipating that.  I purposely plante dthos poblanos so I could provide RancherMan with one of his favorite dishes – lazy-cook’s Chile Relleno.  So c’mon….PEPPERS!

The concord grapevine is loaded with immature grapes.  Now last year I had quite the crop too, but a mischievous group of raccoons came in night after night and ate every stinkin’ one as they ripened!  So RancherMan set a trap next to the grapevines.  He’s also considering setting up a low hotwire to keep them completely away from the grapevines.  I’m thinking I may try to net the grapevine as well, although that will almost guarantee destruction of the net.  Those grapevines grow several inches every day!  We’ll see if I get a crop this year, fingers crossed.

A naughty bull jumped the garden fence and trampled everything. But it was all replanted quickly and has rebounded. Concord Grapevine #TaylorMadeHomestead

Other than that, not much harvest from the garden yet.  The corn I planted is struggling and the cantaloupe & watermelon are growing well but no fruit yet.  The herbs are all growing fantastic though!  I’m harvesting fresh stevia almost every day and using it when making RancherMan’s sweetened sun tea.  He loves it!  And the thyme is looking really good, as is the sage, basil and oregano.  All growing like crazy!

So yeah, I’ve got things going on in the garden but the only thing I’m harvesting consistenly yet is green beans.  How’s your garden going?

~TMH~

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10 thoughts on “Garden Update: Recovering in June

  1. Laurinda

    Your garden sounds amazing! But I’m really intrigued by the stevia- do you just throw fresh leaves into the tea? & do you dry it for winter use? Have I missed a post about it?

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      OK Laurinda, so a few years back my daughter planted stevia and I was so intrigued. So the next spring I bought a stevia plant and found it was indeed pretty easy to grow. It’s now included in my edible landscape. I harvested & dried the leaves last fall but really didn’t know what to do with them. I powdered them and sprinkled them on a parfait I’d made RancherMan & me to see how the taste compared and found that it’s WAY sweeter than sugar, but if you overuse it the stevia can be pretty bitter. A little goes a long way. That plant overwintered just fine so this year I’m primarily using it when I make sun tea. I prefer my tea unsweetened but RancherMan likes it very sweet. So I pull a couple of stems and place it in the jar along with the tea bag and it all steeps together for his pitcher of tea. I don’t care for the tea because it’s sweet, but RancherMan really enjoys it and no longer adds any granulated sugar. I’ve heard you can make an extract with it but I haven’t done that yet. Still bouncing around with how to best use it so I haven’t published anything yet. But it’s saved us bunches on purchased sugar for sweet tea this year! ~TMH~

      Reply
  2. Cynthia D

    I planted my squash late this year hoping to miss some of the bugs, but have had squash beetles already. I have heard that icicle radishes repel one type of bug, but I can’t remember which. I did plant the icicle radishes and still have the beetles. I had read that you need to plant after July 4th to miss the bugs, but I went ahead and planted because I didn’t think I would have enough time to get a crop of winter squash. We had broccoli, cabbage, and turnips earlier but they are gone and are replaced with tomatoes, carrots, squash and green beans. They are all growing well, but will be a few more weeks before we get produce. I didn’t plant potatoes this year, but have 4 plants of volunteers so letting they grow amount the carrots.

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I hate squash beetles so much Cynthia! But so far I’ve had little trouble with them – I do go hunting for those darn eggs every day though and when I find them (often) I remove them. Hopefully the few that I miss that hatch won’t cause me too much grief. And volunteer veggies – gott love those, huh?? ~TMH~

      Reply
  3. Sondra Langle

    When I was doing lots of gardening , I always rotated my crops. Never, ever, planted something in the same spot as the previous year. Also bought lady bugs and praying mantis….they eat lots of “bad” bugs. We had very few bugs with this solution. Tami, where does one get walking onions? Sounds right my alley. Harvest this years and watch new years grow…..happy gardening…..sondra

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      LOL Sondra, it was a gift, but I’ve seen seeds sold online before. But DANG I love not planting onions every year! ~TMH~

      Reply
  4. Kris Noyce

    My bull got into our freshly tilled garden this spring. Nice bull divot, but no true damage, just frustration and time to retill. Glad yours has come back so nicely.

    Reply
  5. Pam

    Here in Michigan I am not harvesting anything yet. I only planted tomatoes, bell peppers, jalapenos, cukes, zucchini, brussel sprouts and broccoli this year. The tomatoes are starting to produce but the fruit is small right now. My peppers really struggled this year so I have been spraying them with epsom salt and water, which has seemed to help them perk up. Looks like cukes and zucchini are getting ready to flower. I found cucumber beetles though so I have started an organic 3 and 1 treatment. I hope it works. I haven’t had cukes and zucchini in a couple years now due to these pests. If I can’t control them this year I will have to take more drastic measures and introduce chemicals to my garden which I do not want to do. Any suggestions on how to rid my garden of these pests organically?

    Reply
    1. Texas Homesteader Post author

      I don’t have too much trouble with cucumber beetles Pam. I believe part of the assistance I receive is the presence of wolf spiders which feed on them. A second thing I do is mulch my garden with spent hay that I take from around the hayrings. I use it for mulch to preserve moisture, but I’ve read it also slows the cucumber beetles. A final help has been my yearly rotation since I’ve read cucumber beetles often come from overwintered pests. I can’t say that’s why I’ve skirted the problem but maybe it’s worth a try? I don’t like to use poisons in my garden either Pam – not only because I don’t want it around my food but also because those beneficial bugs can really be a help and I don’t want to harm the good with the bad. Maybe the other readers can offer organic ways to rid the garden of cucumber beetles?? ~TMH~

      Reply

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